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20121006
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in terms of innovation and politics for two ones. obviously it's a close election. and so campaigns that might have once said, wow, 1%, 2% more of the vote if i you the technique. one or two% and i can use that. there it starting to be a real focus on techniques that can provide very small but measurable boosts. that's one thing that happened after twowp. we realize we are moving to israeli deadlocked. it was the chief pollster and strategies. started writing a memo while the supreme court was still taking up the case, and, you know, the polling data from, you know, from 1984 something like 25% of american were party switchers moved between the two parties. by tbown it was 7%. we are in that era now. a small pert age is the persuadable. most voters are predickble. you know, they like to sell pollsters are undecided in the campaign. there are far fewer voters who are actively moving between the two parties as there were previously. and when you get in to that environment, it's a lot easier for campaigns to visualize where they can get benefits by focusing on turnout or registration f
.8%. that's the best since barack obama took office and it's certainly positive news for his re-election hopes because no president has been re-elected with an unemployment rate above 8% since roosevelt in the 1830s. erin herself has made this point many times. >> the unemployment rate may be high, but the the absolute number is not what matters when it comes to getting re-elected. that's about to trend. every president running since world war ii has won when the rate was falling and lost when it was going up. best example, get ready. >> it's morning again in america. today, more men and women will go to work than ever before in our country's history. with interest rates at about half the record highs of 1980. >> yeah, you know what ad was for. that was ronald reagan, who won the election with a rate of 7.4%. so, the question is, can mr. obama win one like the giper or is the number still bad enough to doom his hopes? well, cue mitt romney. that's what happened today. his team is furiously pointing out how many people are underemployed. last month's household survey found 582,000 of the
it your way or the highway. i did that. i tried that in 2005. through the special election -- i said, here is my way or nothing. it failed miserably. i knew from firsthand that that approach does not work. the people of california, they overwhelmingly reelected the next year. the issues were on the ballot because i was inclusive and reaching across the aisle, to democrats and republicans together. no matter what time it is, 100 years ago, 10 years from now, i think the key thing is that you have to encourage -- have the courage to reach across the aisle. i mentioned in my speech political courage is not political suicide. senator mccain is a perfect example. he worked together with teddy kennedy and senator daschle, so many other people. we have seen his political courage. there are not enough at stories on the media done on the people who have political courage. they always want to look for the negative. >> it has become more so -- political suicide than it used to be. part of it is the drawing of district lines of that everybody agrees with you and the only way you can get in trouble is
. it is an interesting moment. it is a moment i think may replicate itself in general election debates. i cannot imagine obama will let this question and the tax returns go unremarked. what you see there is a couple of things. romney really pivots. he uses the initial question to swing us over to obama and the democrats and how they are against wealth, supposedly. there is also the reaction from the audience. one of the thing that was striking about this year's round of primary debates was the role of that live audience and how they became the influence and how people are perceiving them. in general election debates, the audiences seem to be much more behave. clearly, the audience played a big part in the whole tone of that clip you showed. >> warren decker, these candidates have lines and talking points. how you come across conversationally rather than sound like somebody who is regurgitating the talking points you have been rehearsing? >> that is probably one of the most difficult things you could ever do. i think it is one of those things that you can try to do it and improve your ability to do it by
republican congress and fighting for it advantage in fighting to win the next election. that did not happen by accident. it did not happen by accident. i believe in the free enterprise system and i believe in incentives. they work. we have created a political system in which every incentive is to not cooperate and not compromise and not talk to somebody who has different ideas than your own. and you know, that's great. it's great to be pure on your principal. but we are a nation of 310 million people. and we have all different backgrounds and we have all different life experiences and we have different ideas that we feel strongly about. the way a democracy the size has to work. no matter how deeply you feel about one issue or another, at some point, you have to be able to sit down with someone who has a different idea and find where the overlap is, find where you can give a little and get a little and get the bridges built. and get the programs that a constitutional program that government is responsible for and make them happy. so let me tell you how we have created this. by the way, just
politics happens the morning after the morning after. so, i think -- hearing talking about the election. i don't know how the election is going to come up and make no predictions but i do ask myself if romney gets smashed i don't think the political problem is we have a center left problem and we have a far right party that is a structural problem. the republican party has gone nuts in my view. they've been at war -- there's been a simultaneous -- they've been simultaneously at war with physics at the same time. on the deficit and biological l2 mac, some of them for sure. so the question to me is what happens the morning after this election if romney loses. he wasn't far right enough. i wonder if the morning after the morning after. people would say we have gone too far to the right and we need a different republican party which i think the country desperately needs because it needs to be center-left and it's the only way we agree to get big compromises on these issues. >> can i add the role of history suggests the clinton and ronald reagan the second term as the productive term, the big a
really make of the crunchers who say mitt romney has just a 1-5 chance to win this election? hi, i'm chris mathews. welcome to the show. with us today, new york magazine's john, trish and kelly and the huffington post's d howard. with just over a month to go for mitt romney, given the polls, the debates may be it. it could change the narrative that has dogged him or cemented. romney has the same urgent must-do list that he at the republican convention. only now could be his last chance. today we're going to look at romney's career, back at his career, at some missteps in past debates and also at some gems from barack obama. first up, first on romney's must-do list, get likable. and avoid this kind of reaction when governor rick perry charged that romney had hired illegal lawn workers. >> i'm speaking. i'm speaking. i'm speaking. i'm speaking. you get 30 seconds. this is the way the rules work here. is that i get 60 seconds. and you get -- >> but the american people want the truth. they want -- >> i understand -- >> you say that you knew you had illegals. >> would you please wait? a
people if they believe we are on the road to greece. if this president is re-elected, that is the road we will be on. i will cut and cap spending and as to a balanced budget. -- get us to a balanced budget. [cheers and applause] the last up to get this economy going is to do this -- championed small businesses. help them grow and keep their taxes down. by the way, the president has a bad idea when it comes to small businesses. this is his idea of taking away the right of the secret ballot for workers when they decide whether or not they won a union. they should have a right to a secret ballot. he wants to take it away. i will protect the rights of workers. [applause] president obama says that he has created 5 million new jobs. what he has not told you is that the economy has not created jobs like it should have. this has been the slowest recovery since the great depression. as a matter of fact, he said we would be at 5.4% of unemployment. instead we are at 8.1%. 9 million jobs at different. that is the difference. when paul and i get to the white house, we will get america back to working
." >>> we're now just 36 days from the presidential election and nationally our brand-new cnn/orc poll of likely voters shows the race between president obama and governor romney remaining up for grabs. the president leads 50% to 47%. but his three-point margin is within the poll's sampling error. our chief national correspondent john king is in denver getting ready for the debate over there. that's the site of the debate. john, take us into these numbers. what are you seeing? >> reporter: well, wolf, i can tell you this, talking to senior officials in the romney campaign, they believe after a tough week or ten days, the last several days, they have a little bit of a breeze at their back. they say the race has stabilized. you dig into the numbers. what is the most important issue in this first debate? the economy. look at this poll. which candidate would better handle the economy? the president, 49%, governor romney, 48%. a dead heat. the president has to defend his record. governor romney not only needs to attack his record but to convince voters he has a better place to take them if
that that does not happen in the six weeks leading up to the election, because the narrative of the campaign has been that the the democrats and particularly obama has had four years to make it better and he failed to do so and the numbers prove it. if things get better in october, that undermines a fundamental aspect of a campaign strategy, and i am not questioning whether or not mitt romney, a whole series of republicans want the economy better. right now it's strategically better if the economy is worse, given that argument for election. >> i don't know how you argue that 114,000 jobs is the economy getting a lot better. >> i'm not saying there is. i'm saying there would be a desire for this to remain and look worse in the weeks leading up. >> let's go to john harwood for the last word on this. >> every out party before an election wants voters to feel things are going badly so they vote for change. that's how it is whether republicans are in power or democrats are in power. >> thank you very much. i greatly appreciate your insight. cleaning up the mess. it took three weeks but governor romne
election stage before. romney has the advantage of having simply debated more over the last year. so i think it's kind of an even stage there, but the situation is not comparable to reagan versus carter. the economic metrics when carter was running for re- election were extremely negative, much more negative than they are today, and just this last week, polls show that the pub has more confidence in the president's economic views and vision and program than romney. so he has lost the one advantage that he once had. secondly, there were a lot of independent, undecided voters in 1980 who had lost faith in carter and were just waiting to see if they could feel confidence in his challenger. there are so few independent voters. this is an election that's about mobilizing the bases. so going after the independent voter is not a big surprise. having said all that in the memo put out by david axelrod -- >> who is who? >> he's the campaign guru on the obama side. >> right. >> he points out that five of the last six challengers won the first debate. i think the temptation by the media is going t
, are debating for the first time before the november election. it is a race to decide who will represent texans in the u.s. senate. i hope that by the end of the night to have a better idea of who you want to vote for. we will follow your comments and commentary on twitter. just use the hashtag #belodebate. we will be able to follow along. look for additional information on twitter. we will have supplemental information on each candidate on what -- where they stand on issues. this is a very different debate. we are throwing out the rules. candidates will face each other answering tough questions. moderating tonight is wfaa's senior political supporter -- reporter, brad watson. joining him is political reporter gromer jeffers. let's turn to dan. >> thank you very much. good evening. >> good to be with you. >> thank you for being with us tonight. >> should be fun. >> we are at it again. >> i would like to start tonight by framing with this race is right now for november with questions for each of you. we start with mr. sadler. you have an uphill battle. raising money has been hard. the democratic
to seem unless the debate set the presidential election. it's clear the spt heading toward a environment he has a advantage. romney is going to be exceptional. >> tune in. >> fiewn in and watch. let watch. >> i'm excited. >> talk about in next week in class. >> would you taunt the cross road different and you engage in more localized races congressional and senate how you choose your priorities since so you have a broader scope. >> yeah. that's a good question. we're focused on the presidential election and goal to beat president obama and elect a new president. we are heavily invested in the senate and house race. thing a way about the -- [inaudible] i don't think priority u.s.a. for example -- restore future exclusively dedicated. we're focused on all of the senate races or where you're going do see a lot more of the advertising early your on in the senate races, the bigger the office, the more people pay attention. the we'll be engaged in a number of house races probably a little bit later as we get closer. >> yeah. that's the other thing. the cross roads place outside role in the sen
't that the fundamental problem with the guy? he wants to date these people through the election. he wants their support, but he doesn't want to be one of them. he doesn't want to marry them. is that true? >> yes. look, chris, i think he's a person who is fundamentally ill suited to being the republican nominee given what the republican party currently is. and you could say that on a bunch of different levels. it's an evangelical party and he's a mormon. it's a southern and western -- southern and western party, he's a northeasterner. it's a populist party. he's more or less an establishmentarian. he wanted to say barack obama has failed as an economic steward, and i'm a business guy and so i know how to create jobs. and as soon as that fell away, as soon as people started to think that the economy was doing better, as soon as people started to think that this was about policies for the future and not just about a referendum on the past, he's found himself adrift in terms of what the message is he wants to hue to and he does feel as though this is a base election and he needs to stir up the republican b
that it's going to have to confront over the next several years, not just in the next election? >> it's going to be a long time coming. i think they really need to begin to tie those core issues, things like energy prices and how that connects to the cost of milk to women. i think they need to remember that women are soaring to the top of every educational and professional field out there, the beyond all idea that they we talked to about birth control, um, that they want to be talked to as if they are wards of the state is absurd. and if the republican party can manage to talk to women the way they talk about men, that they care about the real issues that matter to all of us, then i think that's a party for my daughters and for my son. jenna: that's right. ten months old, right? he's little, he still counts. >> yeah, i don't know. [laughter] jenna: sabrina, thank you very much. some important be insight, we appreciate have having you on as always. >> thanks so much. je little context just to show you how important this is. 69.6 million women voted in 2008, 56% came out in support of t
of president barack obama. 39 days until the election. pennsylvania is one of the states that is leaning toward the president, but romney is predicting an upset. >> i've got a little secret here, that is that obama campaign thinks that pennsylvania is in their pocket. they don't need to worry about it. and you're right and they're wrong. we're going to win pennsylvania, we're going to take the white house. >> well, wolf blitzer with us now. so, you know, from washington, wolf, we have seen romney confine his campaign to the nine battleground states. why is he now taking a shot at this state, pennsylvania, which clearly seems to be leaning obama? >> according to the public polls, obama is doing really well in pennsylvania. maybe he's got some private polls that he's doing inside his campaign that shows some other trends developing in pennsylvania. i haven't seen any public polls that would indicate he's got a shot in pennsylvania. i also haven't seen any indication that the romney campaign is spending any campaign money advertising in pennsylvania. if they are, it is really not much. but as i sa
people in the game the first debate. >> did you know mccain beat obama on election day in iowa and that obama got his margin of victory there strictly from early voting? they know that and they're doing it much more robustly this time around. >> the president is urging it on the stump. >> if you look at a state like iowa and which parties requested how many absentee ballots democrats requested a hundred thousand. republicans 16,000. so that gives you an inkling of the early voting and which way it is likely to go. >> i think it is really getting into that point that he has to turn it around by now. >> you know what? things can change overnight. >> they can. >> with a great debate performance. but again, mark halperin, time is running out. if you look at all of the polls, we've been seeing over the past couple weeks, mark, ohio, florida, the big swing states. it seemed to be moving decidedly in the president's direction. let's look right now. i want you to give me your input on these states on a group of other battleground states we haven't looked at as closely. this comes from
. >> the important discussion today. >> many of you know that jon huntsman was elected governor of utah in 2004, when he compiled a very distinguished record. he oversaw major tax and health care reform and also major improvements in public education. following his service as governor he was appointed by president obama as the ambassador to china in 2009. he left that position to run for president and gained tremendous respect for his forthright discussion of important policy challenges. this fall, governor huntsman actually joined the brookings institution as a distinguished fellow, so we are pleased to call in our colleague. bart gordon is a practicing attorney and partner at k&l gates and also a distinguished fellow at the council on competitiveness. bard is a former u.s. representative from the state of tennessee. he served in congress for 26 years from 2007-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bard is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol
situation room." >>> we're down to just 35 days until the actual presidential election exactly five weeks from today. here's where the race may be decided. we're getting our first look inside the debate hall over at the university of denver. barack obama and mitt romney, they are getting ready to face-off tomorrow night. and as cnn's national political correspondent jim acosta discovered, it will be one of the very two times the two men have actually met in person. jim is joining us live from littleton, colorado. what's the latest on this particular score, jim? >> reporter: well, wolf, i can tell you right now that ann romney is about to take the stage behind me. she's going to be holding an event here in littleton, colorado, in a few moments from now. she's been one of this campaign's most effective surrogates and been very busy doing just that while her husband, mitt romney, has been doing debate preparations just a short distance away in denver. it will be fascinating, wolf, to watch the body language between mitt romney and president obama tomorrow night when they meet face-to-face as
blitzer, you're in "the situation room." >>> 34 days from the presidential election but much more importantly right now at least right now we've reached what may be the most decisive night of the 2012 campaign, the first presidential debate at the university of denver. after weeks of downplaying expectations, mitt romney's campaign insiders are finally opening up about what they really think can be accomplished tonight. cnn's national political correspondent jim acosta is in denver getting ready to set the scene. jim. >> reporter: wolf, the romney campaign sees the polls moving in their directions. one of the top priorities tonight is to maintain that trajectory. the romney campaign also says the gop nominee will not be looking to score a knockout tonight but will instead zero in on the president's handling of the economy. you can say that the romney game plan for tonight can be boiled down into two key phrases. do no harm and live to fight another day. just a few hours before one of the most important nights of his political life, mitt romney walked through the debate site in den
of here, already. that hurt him, i think, in his re-election bid against bill clinton back in 1992. it is part of the game. it is what goes on. but i think these debates are going to be really, really important for that, 6%, 7%, 8% who are legitimately undecided or switchable, haven't completely made up their minds. they're going to be watching the three presidential debates, the one vice presidential debate in october. and they'll make up their minds. i think all the people who are voting now early, they basically have already made up their minds obviously. that's why they're voting early and they're not going to necessarily -- they don't think they'll be influenced by the debates. maybe some of them will be. but it will be too late for them because they already will have voted. >> well, let's talk about some of the polls and whether they're indications of anything. particularly these polls that give us a glimpse of three of the nine swing states. journal marist poll showing romney trailing the president by 7 points in new hampshire. romney trailing obama by two points in north ca
is at stake this november, and as my husband has said, the only guarantee is that this election will be closer than the last one and it could all come down to just a few battleground states like wisconsin. can decide the whole thing by just a few thousand votes. and while that may sound like a lot, a few thousand votes -- remember that those votes are spread out across an entire state. across hundreds of cities and thousands of wards. when you think about it like that, just a handful of votes in every ward could make all the difference in the world. that could mean just a couple of votes in a neighborhood. just a single vote in an apartment building or in a dorm room. so understand, especially for our students, that one neighbor that one classmate you get to the polls on november 6, that one voter you persuade that one new volunteer you recruit, that could be the one that puts us over the top, so with just a few evenings on a phone bank, with just a few hours knocking on some doors, everybody in this room has a chance to swing an entire ward for barack obama. if we win enough wards we will win
referendum, upon which parliamentary elections were held which were open to multiple political parties, and now i tell you that syria is continuing to work with the patriotic elements in the opposition to build a new and pluralistic syria that meets the aspirations of its people. syria, at the same time, is determined to carry out its duties and to protect its people from jihadists and takfiri terrorism, which armed terrorist groups are using to spread chaos and create sedition among syrians and threaten their peaceful coexistence. mr. president, we heard from this podium, and on other platforms, some calls that were made by those who are ignorant of the fact or maybe ignoring them, or maybe contributing to their spread, calling on the president of the syrian arab republic to step down. this is blatant interference in the domestic affairs of syria, and the unity of its people and its sovereignty. the syrian people and only the syrian people are authorized to choose their own future and the form of their state, which accommodates all groups throughout the entire spectrum of the syrian p
% seasonal factors. election factors. >> demographics. don't forget, we have the baby boomer age which is actually a true factor. >> are you forecasting 5.9? >> probably not. >> i bet you we get 7.9, don't you think? >> today? >> eventually, yeah, but not today. >> is that a conspiracy theory? >> exactly what it is. we're at 8.1. >> is this obama metrics? a special gauge for the metrics? >> phil, you're talking hundreds of thousands of jobs where you finally get down to this net number and then you got all these other assumptions that go into the participation rate. and there must be 100 assumptionses th s thathat go i. >> you're sitting with a 30 year low. you could easily throw another couple hundred thousand discouraged workers in there and bring the number under eight. the metrics that we look at, in the post war era, no president's ever won re-election with it under 7.3. so there's no way we're getting down to 7.3 in the next month. >> it's following what we now call the great recession, whether that's accurate or not, and that makes it different this time because it's a lot of pe
to commit to a leadership vote until the election. you showed no hesitancy -- >> we are going to go on. in the next session, they will sort out their leaders in the next session. we are tentatively going to move on to immigration. >> mr. sadler, stopping illegal immigration, there have been proposals like tripling the size of border patrol or building expensive fences or walls. however, there are 11.5 million illegal residents in our country today. 1.6 million in texas alone. illegal immigrants. do you support a path to citizenship for people here illegally enter yes i do. -- illegally? >> yes, i do. our border, a lot of texans may not know, el paso is the safest city its size in america. our border is a great economic engine, a great cultural factor, it is a diverse cultural region, and we cannot stick our head in the sand any longer. we need to secure our borders. that is our sovereign right. we should do that. that is our right. we have the military to do that, right there in el paso with equipment available to do so. by that, we have surveillance techniques capable that we can uti
at the cuyahoga county board of elections. state senator nina turner was very first and said the long line is symbolic of how important voting is in ohio. cleveland mayor frank jackson also showed up for some moral support. so far 32% of republicans have requested early ballots. and 26% of democrats. and these early votes in ohio could really be symbolic. mitt romney likely will not become president unless he can take ohio. more john fuglesang coming up on the "full court press" after the break. stay with us. you're about to watch an ad message created by a current tv viewer for capella university. matter. >> i work with adults with developmental disabilities. growing up i had a single mother of four and people in the community were so helpful when they didn't even have much themselves. seeing people and their hardships made me want to make a difference in people's lives to give them hope. receiving a masters degree would open the doors for me to get into a management position where i would be able to do more for people. health matters to all of us. that's wh
are out to buy the election. the reality is is that there are desperate motivations and very different types of people. they are wealthy people and their careers are over and they don't want anything back even if they get a tax break, they don't care. from policies downpour -- from a legal standpoint, how you distinguish from the outset the one guy from the other guy? . there are certain philanthropic goals. there are also real business interests and there is personal interests. as a policy matter, i would not know how to say if you check the box, i am just in it for nothing there for you can give more money to the guy who works for the payday lender. they face huge regulatory barriers. mitt romney my promise that if he is elected, that will not go into effect. >> do you want to dive in? >> 100 years ago, the wall street trusts and elected theodore roosevelt because they thought he would not enforce the antitrust laws. that was ideological and they did not like william jennings bryan because they thought he was a socialist. they said if you want our thinking and the white house, we wan
massachusetts did something quite extraordinary, elected a republican senator to stop obama care, you pushed it through anyway. the so entirely on a partisan basis, instead of bringing america together and having a discussion on this important topic, you pushed through something that you thought was the best answer and drove it through. what we did in the legislature, 87% democrat, we worked together. 200 legislators, only 2 voted against the plan by the time we were finished. we didn't raise taxes. you raised them by a trillion under obama care. we didn't cut medicare. of course, we don't have medicare but we didn't cut medicare by $716 billion. we didn't put in place a board that can tell people ultimately what treatments they're going to receive. we didn't also do something that i think a number of people across this country recognize, which is put people in a position where they're going to lose the insurance they had and they wanted. right now the cbo says up to 20 million people will lose their insurance as obama care goes into effect next year. and likewise a study of mckinsey and com
wanted to say states have rights. but what about the city's rights to elect their own elected officials? and i guess follow their own destiny? winnie's a government interference, i understand you are talking about the federal. but i heard mitt romney say states' rights. is it the right of the state to come into the cities and overthrow the local municipalities? if that is big government, small government. i do not know. i think they should have the right to control their own destiny in their own city. it is on the ballot in november. and i am telling everybody in michigan to a vote it down. we did not need dictatorship. it is a dictator bill. host: thank you. on twitter -- the government to do its job, maintain the general welfare. from debate news, the numbers are and on how many watched on television. more than 67 million watched the first presidential debate. nearly 16 more watched four years ago for about 12 of the 67 who watched president obama square off against mitt romney were between 18-34. fox news channel average 10.4 million viewers. a big improvement over 8.2. cnn clock abo
fugelsang. decide the election. current tv presents coverage of the presidential debate. with unrivaled analysis and commentary. >> you're going to hear that used as a major talking point. (vo) the only network with real-time reaction straight from the campaigns and from viewers like you. >>now that's politically direct. jack you're a little boring. boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the citi private pass page and decided to be...not boring. that's how i met marilyn... giada... really good. yes! [ jack ] ...and alicia. ♪ this girl is on fire ♪ [ male announcer ] use any citi card to get the benefits of private pass. more concerts, more events more experiences. [ jack ] hey, who's boring now? [ male announcer ] get more access with the citi card. [ crowd cheering, mouse clicks ] 33 >> announcer: heard around the country and seen on current tv this is the "bill press show." >> bill: hey, it is 24 minutes after the hour. talking about jeb bush yesterday coming down, clasping down hard >> i am john fugelsang fillin
the election. >> a president struggling with a slow economy, hoping to boost confidence in his leadership. >> i'm not fighting to create democratic and republican jobs, i'm fighting to create american jobs. >> a challenger fighting in the poll es trying to connect with average americans. after months of attacks on the campaign trial, it's time for these candidates to confront each other face to face. >> we will win this election, we will finish what we started! >> i will do better than this president has done for the american people! >> in colorado tonight, barack obama and mitt romney in their first presidential date. >> these debates are an opportunity for each of us to describe the pathway forward. >> what i'm most concerned about is having a serious discussion about what we need to do to keep the country growing. >> two men with different vision on issues voters care about most. both of them. >> we certainly can't go far with a leader who writes off half a nation. >> he said he can't change washington from the inside. he can only change it from outside. well, we're going to give him that ch
, the democratic and republican. >> the center piece of the president's entire re-election campaign is attacking success. >> no more he said/he said. tonight, it's face to face. and a lot of it will focus on your money and your taxes. >> unlike president obama, i will not raise tax on the middle class of america. >> i want to reform the tax code so it's simple, fair. >> the candidates' opinions couldn't be more different and the stakes couldn't be higher. >> their philosophy is if you don't are health insurance, don't get sick. >> now is the moment we can do something. and with your help, we will do something. >> cnbc's coverage of the first presidential debate of the 2012 presidential election begins now. >> tonight some of the most influential figures in the nation on the economy join us here on cnbc. >> we've got representative and hopeful ron paul with us. texas, from texas. he is of course outspoken about the federal reserve policies. robert reich is here with us tonight. also with us grover norquist. the man behind the no new taxes pledge so many republicans made. and bob lutz a former top
that are famous for, you know, for zingers like that. i mean, i do remember lloyd bentsen didn't get elected vice president, know, though it was a famous one-liner. >> hmm. that's, that's very true. and that's going to bring me to my next question which is out of this op-ed by e.j. die onand he writes one of the short comings of the contemporary media environment is while debates are supposed to be occasions where candidates thrash out matters of consequence thoughtfully and in detail the outcomes are often judged by snippets that are more about personal character than issues or problems. and i'm curious to know is it just that we talk about the moments, write about the moments, rerun the moments, but that people 40 are actually watching the debate trying to figure out who to vote for the moments don't resonate with them? >> i actually don't agree with that. i do think there are -- look, there are times where we genuflect over something that happens in a debate or on the campaign trail that might not matter a lot. but look, like for example in the primary you won't be surprised to hear me say thi
. a lot of things we talk about, larry, is turnout when it comes to this election and how important turnout really is going to be. do debates affect turnout? >> absolutely because the turnout battle is really a battle of enthusiasm in the two party bases and, you know the romney people have been pretty frank. paul ryan was very frank over the weekend in saying the ticket has had a tough couple weeks. when you have a tough couple weeks you're enthusiasm level can decline. a good performance in a presidential debate can gin party enthusiasm. that may happen on wednesday for either side. we'll have to see what transpires in the debate. jenna: we always have to wait to actually talk about it until thursday morning. >> that's right. jenna: let me go back to that appearance point that you made. just by having mitt romney on stage with the president, many say that is what is going to make him look more presidential as you mentioned maybe create more support or inspire certain folks out there. "real clear politics" had an interesting article and unnamed democrat was quoted and i will quote
on our web site to find even more information about candidates and the issues this election season. we have seen our society and government faced growing challenges. we hope that our sponsorship of this senate debate will help you gain a better understanding on how each of these candidates would represent us and go for our nation. join us in watching the debate and in thinking about the future. join us on tuesday, november 6. the format will allow for each candidate to make an opening statement and respond to questions from >> the format will allow for each candidate to make an opening statement, to respond to questions from a panel and work -- a panel of reporters, and a closing statement. include robert kennedy. opening statement. >> thank you for this opportunity. over the last year, i've traveled this great state. for so many, it has been harder and harder just to get by. what has changed has not been our work ethic, it has been the rules. today in washington, powerful rules. of middle-class families. that is why wisconsin needs a senator who will. i've spent my time in washington
a shot of optimism and encouragement for both american workers and for the president's re-election bid. the september jobs report showing that employers added 114,000 new jobs. the unemployment rate falling to 7.8%. the lowest it's been since january 2009. adding to the positive news, job gains were revised upward by 40,000 for july and by 46,000 for august. casting the summer jobs picture in a much warmer glow overall and the president took the news to battleground virginia this morning where it was greeted with an enthusiastic cheer. >> the unemployment rate has fallen to its lowest level since i took office. more americans entered the workforce, more people are getting jobs. today's news certainly is not an excuse to try to talk down the economy to score a few political points. it's a reminder that this country has come too far to turn back now. >> you heard the president. it's no day to talk down the economy to score political points. but shadowing the president in virginia, mitt romney waited nine minutes deep into his scintillating stump speech before even mentioning the big news
the first battleground state to in the e neral election. at least 400,000 iowans are expected to vote before election day, november 6. in other battleground states, voting begins in colorado october 22, more than two million people are expected to cast early ballots there. in florida, balloting starts october 27 with more than four million early voters expected. john dickerson is in our washington bureau. he's our political director. and, john, i wonder what impact does all this early voting have on the campaigns? t reporter: well, the presidential race is now on two reacks-- the traditional election track headed towards november 6 and the early voting track, where what the candidates say and two in these battleground states ask influence votes being cast right now. both candidates have traveled to early-voting states to implore voters to cast their ballots. barack obama will be preparing for debates in nevada, where cbs expects 65% of vote voters to vote early. his presence in the state of nevada stirs up activities for democrats who then will try to arck up their voters early. if a campaig
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